Beef, Rosemary and Red Wine Pie

Beef, Rosemary and Red Wine Pie with Rough Puff Pastry | Gather and Graze

It’s doubtful that I’ll ever reach the stage where creating gels, foams or other Heston-esque kitchen creations becomes part of my everyday cooking repertoire… however now and then, there are days when I’m up for the challenge of preparing or cooking something that might have seemed a little daunting before. De-boning quail for Sandra’s Pan Fried Quail with Vincotto Glazed Grapes is a prime example… and then making my first ever Rough Puff Pastry to encase this delicious Beef, Rosemary and Red Wine Pie, on this past weekend is another.

The prevalent thought for me at such times is that surely I’m going to botch the job completely, rendering dinner inedible for my poor, dear family. Though without taking these risks, we would simply never find out just how easy some things are to produce; how the flavour can be in such stark contrast with it’s shop-bought alternative; and what a great sense of accomplishment can be felt when the challenge pays off and the family dinner is actually, really quite edible!

Beef, Rosemary & Red Wine Pie | Gather and Graze

For the Beef, Rosemary & Red Wine Filling:

  • 2 Tablespoons Olive Oil
  • 1 Medium Brown (or Red) Onion (chopped)
  • 2 Leeks (white and pale green parts only, washed and sliced)
  • 3 Tablespoons Fresh Rosemary Leaves (finely chopped)
  • 2 Cloves of Garlic (crushed)
  • 750g (about 1½lbs) Diced Beef (I used a mixture of Chuck and Blade Steak)
  • 250mls (1 Cup) Red Wine (I used a nice Aussie Shiraz)
  • 250mls (1 Cup) Good Quality Beef Stock
  • 2 Bay Leaves
  • 2 Tablespoons Concentrated Tomato Paste
  • 2 Teaspoons Worcestershire Sauce
  • Sea Salt and Black Pepper
  • 15g (1½ Tablespoons) Cornflour (mixed together with 3 Tablespoons Water)

For the Rough Puff Pastry:

  • 300g (2 Cups) Plain Flour
  • 5g (1 Teaspoon) Sea Salt
  • 250g (1 Cup) Unsalted Butter (diced into small cubes)
  • Approx 125mls (½ Cup) Chilled Water

To make the Beef, Rosemary & Red Wine Filling:

Place a medium sized saucepan over low-medium heat and sauté the onion, leek and rosemary (with a pinch of salt) in the olive oil until soft and translucent (about 8-10 minutes). Add the crushed garlic in the last couple of minutes to sauté gently. Remove the cooked vegetables to a bowl and set aside for the moment.

Beef, Rosemary and Red Wine Pie with Rough Puff Pastry | Gather and Graze

Add a little more olive oil if required and over medium-high heat, brown the diced beef (in a couple of batches, so as not to overcrowd the pan). When done, return the cooked onion and leek to the pan and pour in the red wine, allowing it to simmer for about 5 minutes, to burn off the alcohol. Then add the stock and bay leaves. Stir and allow to simmer (covered) for about 1½ – 2 hours, or until tender.

Once the beef is tender, add in the tomato paste, worcestershire sauce and the cornflour liquid and stir to combine. Simmer gently for another 10 – 15 minutes, until the gravy has thickened nicely. Allow to cool completely before using the filling in the pie.

Beef, Rosemary and Red Wine Pie with Rough Puff Pastry | Gather and Graze

To make the Rough Puff Pastry:

Sift the flour and salt into a large mixing bowl and roughly rub in the small cubes of butter.

Add about three quarters of the water and mix it in (adding a little more water gradually if required) until it comes together nicely as a dough. It should be neither too sticky or too dry and you should be able to see little flecks/small chunks of butter within.

On a floured board, roll the dough out into a large rectangle, with the short side closest to you.

Beef, Rosemary and Red Wine Pie with Rough Puff Pastry | Gather and Graze

Fold the end furthest away from you in by a third and then fold the bottom third over the top of this (a little like folding a business letter). Turn the dough a quarter turn and once again roll it out into a large rectangle. Repeat this process a further 4 times. Cover the pastry in plastic wrap and refrigerate for about 30 – 40 minutes, before rolling it out for the pie.

Beef, Rosemary & Red Wine Pie with Rough Puff Pastry | Gather and Graze

To assemble the pie:

Pre-heat the oven to 180°C/350°F.

Remove the pastry from the fridge and cut the dough into 2 portions (one a little larger than the other). Roll out the larger portion first, to an appropriate size to fit your pie tin (mine is about 22cm x 17cm). Line the tin, trimming any excess around the edges – these bits can be used for decorating the top, if you wish).

Scoop the beef and red wine filling into the pastry lined tin and then roll out the other portion of pastry that will cover the top. Be sure to first brush the edges with a little water, before laying the sheet of pastry on top of the pie. Use a fork to press around the edges to seal the pie and place a couple of slits in the middle, using a sharp knife, to allow steam to escape. Decorate with the excess bits of pastry if you wish.

Beef, Rosemary & Red Wine Pie with Rough Puff Pastry | Gather and Graze

Place the pie into the pre-heated oven and bake for about 45-50 minutes, until the pastry is cooked and golden brown on top.

Allow to cool slightly, before serving with a side of mashed potatoes and other steamed vegetables.

Beef, Rosemary and Red Wine Pie with Rough Puff Pastry | Gather and Graze

Notes on Cooking:

  • This could also be made into 4 individual pies, though you will most likely need to make a larger quantity of pastry in order to do so (depending on the size of your pie tins).
  • Feel free to substitute or add other vegetables to this recipe… carrots and other root vegetables would work particularly well.

Advertisements

37 thoughts on “Beef, Rosemary and Red Wine Pie

    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      I had no idea you were vegetarian HM! Lately I’ve been feeling kind of guilty that G&G is rather lacking in the vegetarian category… plus the family and I occasionally talk about starting up ‘Meatless Mondays’ – now we just need to stop talking about it and actually do it! 🙂 Love a good Aussie Shiraz!

      Reply
      1. thehungrymum

        Technically I am a pescetarian ie I eat seafood but I haven’t eaten meat/chook for abt 25 years. We do meatless Mondays here, well I usually am doing a fast day on Monday, so it is often just salad all around!

        Reply
  1. Matt

    oh now this right here looks delicious! Pastry and I don’t usually get along…. and when i say usually I mean never get along! Great post!

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Cheers Matt! This pastry is a total sweetheart… gets along with everyone! It really is incredibly easy and fast to make and would be perfect for any home-made pies, pasties, sausage rolls etc. Hope you’re tempted to give it a try one day!

      Reply
  2. laurasmess

    SO stunning Margot!! That pastry! I am terrible at puff, I’ve gotten it wrong a few times so I usually buy it these days. Your rough puff looks perfect. So good for this unseasonally cold Aussie winter! xx

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Hate to admit it Laura, but I’ve never tried making proper Puff Pastry… this is as close as I’ve got! Such a revelation in flavour though (no doubt due to the butter!) I’ve been away this past week, but I’m keen to make more of this pastry soon and try out some different fillings.
      Hope very much that you’re on the mend now and getting full use of your hand back! M.xx

      Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Thanks so much Sonal! I think a vegetarian pie using this pastry would be beautiful – with the addition of other root vegetables, some spinach or kale and even a little cheese! 🙂

      Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Linda, you’ve inspired me before by making your own puff pastry and even though this is a ‘rough’ puff it still tasted fabulous and will be my ‘go-to’ pastry in future when time is short! I’ve been away this week, but will come across very soon to see what you’ve been up to lately in your kitchen – I think I caught a sneak peak of some little sweet treats! M.xx

      Reply
  3. Fae's Twist & Tango

    Your narrative is so close to my heart. I always knew I cooked Persian dishes well. But for blogging, I have challenged myself to cuisines and recipes beyond my imagination. Some with success and some nothing to mention. My knowledge, repertoire and know-how in preparations of food have sure increased/improved in the last 3 years. I also am witnessing my fellow food bloggers’ subjects of presentation growing substantially. Margot, you always shined, and now more than ever. I am incredibly impressed and have a lot to learn from. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Oh Fae, that really is one of the kindest comments I’ve ever received… and I feel so humbled that it has come from you! Thank you! Each time I visit your blog, I’m in awe of all that you do and the knowledge that you’ve acquired and are kind enough to share with us all. Kind of funny that the more I learn in the food world, the more I seem to realise how little I know!
      My apologies also for taking so long in responding – we’ve been away for the past week. M.xx

      Reply
  4. tinywhitecottage

    What a fantastic pie Margot! I always love your style. So clean and elegant, a bit challenging, yet do-able…very inspiring to say the least! I really want to make this pie. The beef filling is spot on with all those wonderful ingredients and the rosemary petals are such a lovely touch.

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Thanks so very much Seana and I’m sorry to take so long to respond… we’ve just arrived home from a week away on holidays. I’m really keen to make this again soon, the pastry really does have such a great flavour and texture – much nicer than any of the shop-bought pastry I’ve tried over the years! Looking forward to perhaps trying a chicken and leek filling next time… perfect for this time of year! 🙂

      Reply
  5. jothetartqueen

    I think we can leave the gel and theatrics to the restaurants.
    think making your own puff pastry (even if its a rough puff) makes a lot of difference to the pie..must be really gratifying to complete it with such great results! This sounds like a very delicious dinner!

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Thanks very much Jo! This rough puff pastry made a lot more difference than I thought it would – the flavour (due to lots of butter!) was really, really lovely and texture was light and puffy, just as it should be. I’ll be making this a lot in future!

      Reply
  6. Kitsch n flavours

    That rough puff (dontcha just love the name) sounds ridiculously easy to make. I’ve only ever made puff pastry and that, believe me, was a bore! I’ll definitely try this pastry in autumn as I adore pie. Isn’t it funny that all you have to do these days is mention Heston-esque and most people know of whom you’re talking about.

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      It really is so easy to make… and tastes infinitely better than the puff pastry I usually buy from the shops (I’m sure that the quality of the butter makes a big difference). I’ll be using this from now on for all sorts of savoury and sweet pastries.
      Heston really is totally inspiring and I adore watching all of the experimentation that goes on in his shows. Did you know that they’ve brought ‘The Fat Duck’ out to Melbourne for 6 months while they’re renovating the restaurant in Bray?

      Reply
      1. Kitsch n flavours

        No, but I did know he’s in Aus. You can tell I’m not a regular to the Fat Duck as I didn’t even realise it’s not open! And it’s not that far from where I live.

        Reply
  7. ladyredspecs

    Brava Margot, your pastry looks wonderful! Mindful handling of ingredients by an intelligent cook = success. What’s the next kitchen challenge?

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      That’s very kind Sandra, thank you! For the next kitchen challenge… hmmm… perhaps either macarons (something I keep putting off, as I’ve tasted so many wonderful ones, that I just know mine will never be quite so fabulous) or creme brûlée (something I adore if it’s done perfectly, but have never made myself). I’m sure you will have made both of these, so please let me know if you have any tips for success! 🙂

      Reply
      1. ladyredspecs

        I confess I’ve never made macarons. I must be the only person on earth who doesn’t care too much for them. My advice for creme brulee is use pure cream and loads of yolks. Chill the custards well after baking and use a blow torch to quickly make the toffee without heating the custard. Good luck!

        Reply
        1. Gather and Graze Post author

          Thanks so much for the tips Sandra! I have a blow torch that I haven’t actually used yet… can I ask what type of sugar you recommend for the toffee? There seems to be varying advice out there…

          Reply
          1. ladyredspecs

            Castor sugar is the quickest to melt and caramelize. The trick is to get just the right amount evenly distributed on the surface of the chilled custard. This is trial and error. Make one at a time and you’ll soon perfect the technique. Be sure all the sugar melts and caramelizes. It should happen without warming the custard. Look forward to your post!

            Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Thanks very much Tanya! I’ll be making all manner of pastries with this rough puff now… something reassuring about knowing exactly what’s going into your food.

      Reply

Love to hear your thoughts...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s