Salted Caramel Biscuits/Cookies

Salted Caramel Cookies | Gather and Graze

A variation on the classic Jam-Drop Cookie, these salted caramel-filled cookies make for a rather delicious change. Best served alongside a strong cup of coffee or black tea!

School holidays are coming to a close here in Canberra, so as of next week, life will slip back into the usual routine, which hopefully will also see blogging become a weekly occurrence once more. Apologies for my recent sporadic posting – life has been busy of late.

Salted Caramel Biscuits/Cookies | Gather and Graze

  • Servings: Makes 36-40 Cookies
  • Print

For the Cookies:

  • 160g (⅔ Cup) Unsalted Butter (softened)
  • 115g (½ Cup) Raw Caster Sugar
  • 1 Large Free-Range Egg
  • 1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract
  • 350g (2 Cups) Plain/All-Purpose Flour (sifted)
  • Pinch of Salt

For the Caramel Filling:

  • 70g (⅓ Cup) Brown Sugar
  • 60g (¼ Cup) Unsalted Butter
  • 2 Tablespoons Pure (Heavy) Cream
  • Sea Salt Flakes (I used Fleur de Sel) for sprinkling over the tops

To make the Cookies:

Place the butter, sugar and vanilla extract into the bowl of an electric mixer and beat until light and fluffy. Add the egg and continue to beat until combined. Scrape down the edges of the bowl as required. Now add the flour and salt and mix on low speed until the cookie dough comes together. Cover and refrigerate the dough for at least 1 hour.

Pre-heat the oven to 190°C/375°F. Line 2 large baking trays with baking/parchment paper.

Shape the dough into balls (2.5cm/1inch in diameter) and place, leaving a little space between each to allow for spreading, onto the baking trays. Flatten each ball slightly, then using the end of a wooden spoon, press down into the middle of each to create an indent.

Salted Caramel Cookies | Gather and Graze

Bake each tray of cookies for about 8-9 minutes or until just starting to turn a golden colour. Remove from the oven and allow to cool completely on a wire rack.

To make the Caramel Filling:

Place the butter and sugar into a small saucepan and stir constantly as you bring it to a boil. Allow to boil for 1 minute, before removing from the heat and stirring in the cream.

Allow the caramel to cool down for about 15 minutes.

Salted Caramel Cookies | Gather and Graze

Spoon a little caramel into each cookie indent, until it just reaches the top. Sprinkle the top of each cookie with a small amount of sea salt. Allow the caramel to set for 10-15 minutes, before serving.

Salted Caramel Cookies | Gather and Graze

  • Adapted from a ‘Land O’Lakes’ recipe

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44 thoughts on “Salted Caramel Biscuits/Cookies

  1. cookbookchaos

    These are a great alternative to jam drops! I don’t like the jam drops too much, but I love caramel. I will be making these for the holiday season, as I’m sure everyone will love them and they will be gone in a second. I like that the recipe seems easy for even a ‘non-baker.’ You explain everything in a simple manner so that it will be easy to follow. Thanks for sharing 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Such a kind comment, thank you so much! All the best with your holiday season baking – can’t believe how quickly this year has disappeared. Cheers, Margot

      Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Thanks so very much Fae, so pleased you like the look of them. Apologies for the delay in responding, I must have somehow missed this comment. 😦 Sorry! xx

      Reply
  2. The Hungry Mum

    omgosh! what a beautiful treat! Salted caramel ANYTHING is my weakness and your bickies look perfect. So lovely to actually meet at eat drink blog! I had a blast, am so exhausted today! I will 100 per cent be going to next years conference.

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      That’s very sweet of you to say HM, salted caramel is a favourite of mine too.
      It really was an amazing weekend, which couldn’t have been packed any fuller with food, wine, info, inspiration and fabulous fellow bloggers. So wonderful to meet you too! xx

      Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Thanks for your comment… these are all pretty stock standard biscuit ingredients, which can most certainly be made on a budget. Leave out the vanilla extract if need be and just use a very small amount of whatever salt you have on hand. Cheers, Margot

      Reply
  3. ChgoJohn

    Great cookies, Margot, and I very much prefer salted caramel to jam. Great idea using a squeeze bottle, too, being I’m pastry bag-impaired. 36 cookies does seem like a lot but I guess I would just have to soldier on until not a one remains. It’s a tough job … 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      The squeeze bottle worked a charm John, I’ll edit the post in a minute to suggest it… seems only fair! 😉 The cookies disappeared in a flash here, but you could always freeze a few, though would recommend doing so without the filling.
      Oh and your wonderful book has arrived… it was like opening a Christmas parcel! So exciting! You’ve done such a great job John and it reads so well… I’ve been placing sticky notes on each of the recipes I’m keen to try first. Will come across soon to leave you another note on your site as well. Cheers, Margot

      Reply
  4. Johnny Hepburn

    How do you manage to get them looking so neat?! I’d have caramel everywhere but where it should be. Oh, and couldn’t help but notice pure/heavy cream. It’s double over here. Don’t know why that reminds me to check the spelling of mould on TDPC.

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      😀 I kind of cheated Johnny and probably should make mention of it in the post above… I ended up using a Wilton Squeeze Bottle (see the link below…) to get the caramel into the indents. Only as I knew that they were to be photographed for the blog… and didn’t want a complete mess on my hands if the teaspoon didn’t do as it was told!
      http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E310280-475A-BAC0-5E93DEB3041892C7
      Also interesting to read about all the different variations of cream around the world on wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cream – the cream that we call Pure Cream is about 35% fat and doesn’t have any artificial thickeners added to it, though it’s quite thin and can be simply poured into sauces etc or onto a dessert or else whipped if required – quite a versatile cream and one that I use a lot. Double cream for us is a lot heavier, higher in fat content and already very thick… can be scooped onto a dessert or the top of a scone and it will hold it’s shape.
      Mold or mould? I go for mould when it’s a cooking implement and mold for the blue/green fungus – though I know everyone uses them differently… 🙂

      Reply
      1. Johnny Hepburn

        Ah ha. You’re the clever one in the kitchen and I’m the klutz! Must replace my burst piping bag.

        Thanks for that link. I never knew there were so many differing creams. Here, especially for day to day cooking, it’s single or double. I think I’ll try and use percentages in future.

        And I spelt it the American way. Ouch. I really do read too many blogs. I should change that, shouldn’t I? I mean, as in mold. 🙂

        Reply
        1. Gather and Graze Post author

          Just curious… with the cream – from that list, the closest in fat content in the UK appears to be whipping cream, but is this not what you would naturally opt for in a sauce like this? Would double cream be your preference? Perhaps I should also pull out my Harold McGee book to read up on his Cream/Dairy chapter…
          Come to think of it, I think I just use ‘mould’ for both… really… why don’t we all use the same spelling? Seems absolutely crazy!

          Reply
          1. Johnny Hepburn

            I’m probably not the best person to ask as I don’t use cream loads. But, for a caramel, whipping cream would be safer as it’s pourable. I can imagine a large dollop of double would cause it to spit horribly.

            Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Thanks Cheri! This caramel worked really well for me… stays quite soft as it doesn’t reach anywhere near the hardball stage… but perfect for filling these little biscuits. If you do happen to give it a go, I’d love to back from you with your thoughts. Cheers, Margot

      Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      I wish you could just reach in and take one too cheergerm! Both of my boys really enjoyed these (and they’ve been disappearing fast), despite initial concerns that jam couldn’t be beaten as the filling of choice. Definitely nice to mix it up now and then though!

      Reply
  5. Francesca

    They look wonderful, Margot! I think your variation is much more exciting for anyone who has a big sweet tooth like Her Majesty and my mom! 😛

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Thank you dear Francesca! I do so appreciate your kind comments, even though I know that you’re not so keen on sweet treats. The next post will be savoury – just for you! xx

      Reply
  6. Chica Andaluza

    I will definitely be making these when I am back in England and have my reliable oven – I adore salted caramel and may well have to do some extensive quality control!

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Haha, that’s been my excuse too Tanya! Thankfully the few that I thought might have been slightly dodgy ended up being fine after all… 😀 Hope you’re having a beautiful time up on the mountain!

      Reply
  7. tinywhitecottage

    I love jam drop cookies too and recently went through a spell of baking them at least twice a week. The neighbor kids caught on and (much to my son’s dismay) would show up, find their way into the kitchen and devour the whole lot! So, I’d make another batch, and another…etc. I’m definitely going to make a batch with your salted caramel filling. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gather and Graze Post author

      Oh dear Seana… rather cheeky of the neighbour’s kids to be scoffing all your yummy cookies! I think I’d be hiding the jam drops and putting out some crackers instead. 😉 Have a great weekend!

      Reply

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