Salmon and Prawns in Spicy Coconut Broth

Salmon and Prawns in Spicy Coconut Broth | gatherandgraze.com

Yesterday afternoon I spent a very pleasant hour or so sorting (and at long last, filing!) an ever-growing pile of recipes that have been ripped out of cooking magazines over the years. Often there are only a few recipes inside that truly appeal, so with each move we’ve made around the country or world, I’ve found it difficult to justify the continual packing and unpacking of so many magazines… plus I’m loathe to stack them onto our bookshelves, which quite honestly deserve a finer quality of literature. For the most part though they are all recipes that I would still like to try out at some stage in the future and finally having them in some sort of order will make this much more achievable.

The following recipe was one of the first that I sorted. It was immediately placed to one side with intentions of making it sooner rather than later. In fact it was made much sooner than I’d anticipated – that very same night! So quick and easy to make, yet beautifully fragrant, light and healthful. The whole family enjoyed this one… I prepared a little steamed jasmine rice to have on the side, to soak up some of the delicious broth at the end. We’re already looking forward to the next time this lovely dish graces our table! It came from a Delicious Magazine… a Valli Little recipe, I think… I adapted it very slightly, in that I didn’t panfry the salmon and prawns separately (who wants to wash up an extra frypan?!) but instead poached the salmon and prawns in the broth… it worked beautifully.

Salmon and Prawns in Spicy Coconut Broth

  • 1 Tablespoon Sunflower Oil
  • 2-3 Tablespoons Laksa Paste (taste and add the extra tbsp if too mild)
  • 400ml Can Coconut Milk
  • 125ml/½ Cup Free-Range Chicken Stock
  • 1 Tablespoon Brown Sugar
  • 4 Kaffir Lime Leaves (I used dried ones)
  • 4 Salmon Fillets (about 125g each)
  • 12 Raw Prawns (Peeled and Deveined, tails left intact) or Cooked Prawns if you prefer (which will just need warming in the broth for a minute or so before serving)
  • 2 Tablespoons Fresh Lime Juice
  • 2 Tablespoons Fish Sauce
  • 100g (approx 4-5 each) Snow Peas (Blanched for 2mins in boiling water, then drained)
  • Fresh Coriander/Cilantro Leaves (for Garnishing)

In a large deep frypan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the paste and stir for about 30 seconds until fragrant. Now add the coconut milk, stock, sugar and kaffir lime leaves. Allow to simmer for about 5 minutes.

Add the salmon fillets to the broth and allow them to poach for 4-5 minutes (covering the pan with a lid). Then add the prawns and simmer for a further 2-3 minutes. Pour in the lime juice and fish sauce and remove from the heat as soon as the salmon and prawns are cooked to perfection.

Divide the seafood and snow peas among 4 shallow bowls and then pour over the broth and garnish with fresh coriander. Serve immediately as is, or with a side of steamed jasmine rice.

* In future I think I’ll toss the snow peas into the broth at the same time as the prawns, rather than boiling them separately in yet another saucepan… LOVE a one pot dish! 

** Purchase the best Laksa paste you can find – it’s worth it. Or even better, make your own if you have the time.

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46 thoughts on “Salmon and Prawns in Spicy Coconut Broth

  1. oscardarling

    This looks absolutely beautiful…so fresh and vibrant! I’m a sucker for salmon and coconut in any form and this looks just the thing to warm up a chilly English evening and transport me to sunnier climes!

    Reply
      1. oscardarling

        It’s one of the things I love most about it…I love making food that takes me to places I’ve never been (hello Lebanese and Turkish mezzes!) but I also love making things that take me back to a very specific place and time too. Have a lovely day Margot!

        Reply
    1. Margot @ Gather and Graze Post author

      That’s exciting to hear Laura! Hope the weather cools off a little for you… this dish is great for the warmer weather, but no-one needs 40+ temps to deal with! Please let me know if you do give it a try and your thoughts on it… always good to get some feedback 🙂

      Reply
  2. Kitsch n flavours

    Have to admit, I’d never heard of laksa before. I’ve just Googled, and it is for sale over here. Probably not in my local stores, though. Wanted to ask what you thought of the dried kaffir lime leaves, as I can buy those in the small International store. I’ve never bothered with them as I use bay leaves in everything. Besides, I really don’t know jot about Far Eastern food. But I love the spices used in the laksa that’s published on Taste.com.au. If that’s anything to go by. Sounds delicious with the coconut milk and lime.

    Reply
    1. Margot @ Gather and Graze Post author

      Oh, laksa is wonderful Johnny – it would be worth making up a paste yourself, or trying to buy a jar online somehow. Like most curries, it works well with all different types of meat, seafood and vegetables. A traditional laksa is usually served up in a large bowl with meat, asian greens and noodles that all need slurping up… not the easiest dish to eat cleanly and politely… but oh so delicious! I really hope you decide to give it a try sometime.

      Reply
  3. ladyredspecs

    This is my sort of food Margot and perfect when the weather is hot and steamy. I could eat Asian style soup every day? I relate to the magazine cutting build up. Usually i chuck much more than I keep on second look

    Reply
    1. Margot @ Gather and Graze Post author

      My boys are much more adventurous these days when trying spicy foods, so I’m thrilled to finally be able to cook these kinds of dishes for the whole family (and not just 2 of us…)
      I think I need to start leaving the foodie magazines on the newsagent shelf and just work my way through all the ones I have… added to all the cookbooks… and the bookmarked recipes from inspiring bloggers like yourself! 🙂

      Reply
      1. polianthus

        Hi Margot – I realise I have filed so much stuff away – art, galleries, artists, travel and hotels, designer furniture etc and then when I want to go somewhere /do something I google instead as I cannot be bothered to go through the folders as I dont know whats in there, scanning hits two birds with one stone, less paper and you can file in a way that is easily searcheable – an assistant I once worked with showed me the way on this one 🙂 – she gave all her cookbooks away and filed what she wanted to keep, Id never go that far but I liked the idea

        Reply
        1. Margot @ Gather and Graze Post author

          It is a really good idea, but yes magazines are one thing and cookbooks another. I really struggle when it comes around to the school fete each year to work out which cookbooks I might be able to part with… usually one or two, but no more than that.

          Reply
          1. polianthus

            ah yes one or two I could do that as well, I have a very old jewish cookbook that focuses on traditional stuff like lungs etc. which I likely will never need …but I still have it..

            Reply
  4. A Home Cook

    Magazine clippings … a great pile of somedays, waiting for attention. I admire your courage in facing them and starting to sort through. This was a great place to start, too. Thanks for the inspiration.

    Reply
    1. Margot @ Gather and Graze Post author

      Thanks… it feels great to have finally put some order into that big stack of recipes and to revisit what I’d actually cut out. Lovely to have the time over the school holidays to do these sorts of things!

      Reply
  5. apuginthekitchen

    I want to make this today, don’t have any kaffir lime leaves, can I just use lime? I know it’s different but would it alter the taste dramatically? Love this!!!

    Reply
    1. Margot @ Gather and Graze Post author

      Hi Suzanne, that’s fabulous! I’d probably use some strips of lime zest instead of lime leaves, if it were me… I’m tempted to go out this week and find a little kaffir lime tree to plant in a pot. Though I’ve also heard that the leaves keep really well in a zip-loc bag in the freezer. Love to hear what you think if you give it a go today! M 🙂

      Reply
    1. Margot @ Gather and Graze Post author

      Thanks Loretta – we all loved the flavour of the broth! I served some steamed rice on the side (mostly for the kids) to add in to their broth at the end, but I thought it was great served purely as a seafood soup!

      Reply

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